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Youth Pen

Livre

500 pages

11€

Livraison France : 3.30€

ISBN : 978-2-36523-034-6

Disponible : Papier & Numérique

Acheter le livre :

  1. Pour commander l'édition Kindle :Amazon

Résumé

The tightly woven narrative of a young man who was there when the Feds’ most ambitious plan backfired. America is still paying the price. Confronted with an unprecedented flood of young federal felons in the late 1960s, the Bureau of Prisons decided to isolate the youth of America in a penitentiary geared solely toward convicts between the ages of 18 and 28; to keep these young offenders from older convict populations. Nonviolent youths who had committed victimless crimes were caged in an environment that drove them to become even more criminal in order to survive.

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Commentaires

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Posté le 2 janvier 2015
Pat

I found the book to be one of the most informative & True to life nonfiction writing about a subject that is so important to our society and culture.

Posté le 2 janvier 2015
desertflier

I seldom read novels, but when an acquaintance highly recommended Youth Pen I gave it a try. I could go on with artsy-fartsy statements about “page turner”, “character development”, “thickening plot”, etc. but I’m not equipped to do that. I’ll just say that I was very pleased to read it, and that the further I read the more I wanted to see how it turned out, but also the more I wanted to delay that – it was that good. I suppose if you’ve absolutely no interest in prison life, or perhaps even life itself as described by a top-notch novelist, you might want to pass on this. I had no previous interest in the topic. Without that recommendation I would have remained unaware of Youth Pen, but for several impassioned hours I was thankful to have discovered it.

Posté le 2 janvier 2015
Faye M. Swetky

Confronted with an unprecedented flood of young federal felons in the late 1960’s, the Bureau of Prisons decided to isolate the youth of America in a penitentiary geared solely toward convicts between the ages of 18 and 28 and to keep these young offenders apart from older convict populations. Nonviolent youths who had committed victimless crimes (Whites: draft-dodging and drug infractions; Blacks: civil rights protests and drug infractions; Browns: illegal entry and drug infractions; Homosexuals: drug infractions) were caged in an environment that drove them to become even more criminal in order to survive.

YOUTH PEN is a tightly woven narrative of a young man who was there when the Feds’ most ambitious plan backfired. And America is still paying the price.

This story, a dynamite historical expose indicative of many failed and failing federal programs today, was written by someone who was there and survived. The only one who ever took pen to paper to write about the experience. I couldn’t stop reading. Highly recommended.

Posté le 2 janvier 2015
Cayla Calderwood

An absolute must read! A powerful, comedic, and raw account of life within a federal prison during one of American History’s most potent eras. The writing style is unique and gripping and the content is fascinating.

Posté le 2 janvier 2015
D. J. Herda

Raw. Gritty. Powerful. This remarkably candid account of the author’s incarceration in a federal reformatory at Lompoc, California–less-than-affectionately known as “Youth Pen”–is a look into the underbelly of crime and punishment in America today. In the author’s own words:

“In 1969 I was yanked out of the Ph.D. program at Harvard and indicted for “Refusal to Submit for Induction” (draft dodging). After a year of wrangling and stalling, I was incarcerated and spent time in the maximum-security penitentiary F.C.I. Lompoc, the “Youth Pen.” Watergate was just breaking. Nixon and Agnew, a criminal presidency, were on the verge of getting busted and ousted themselves. The young adults of America were disenchanted and unhappy, no more so than in the prisons. During my time in Youth Pen I managed to smuggle thousands of pages of notes to the outside. My expose comes directly from these notes. Every word is true.”

And riveting! If you don’t read this book and come away with a better appreciation of why we need to pay closer attention to our kids, there’s no hope for a better tomorrow. We can start by getting scared. Continue by getting informed. End by getting involved. This compellingly written first-hand account will come as an eye-opening look into just how ill-equipped the federal government is to guide America’s future. A microcosm of our culture and times today, it opens with a bang and never lets up until the final bell. I couldn’t put it down. All true, all real, all here–at last. By someone who actually lived through it. Five stars aren’t saying enough.